[Movies] Talk about the last movie you saw 2: Electric Threadaloo

Dave

Staff member
Since Netflix got Godzilla Minus One this weekend I finally finished watching it. I’m going to have to watch it all in a single sitting I think. It was one of the best Godzilla movies I’ve seen.
 
Wil Wheaton seems like an ok guy, but I fucking hate him as an audiobook reader. I can't take Wesley's voice whispering into my ear for 20 hours.

The OG martian audiobook performer is amazing, and he worked hard to get that book. It's a shame it was rereleased with who I would consider a vastly inferior narrator.
Wheaton reads one of Joe Hill's shorts about a library. His narration was fine, but his voice doesn't lend itself to getting lost in the story. It's Wheaton reading a book.
 
Nah, I really like Wil Wheaton, and I don't mind Wesley as a character, I just don't like the cadence he reads books at.
 
I don't mind him as a narrator. He's bested by many talented performers out there in the audiobook world, it's true, but I still listen to the books he narrates.
 
I fucking hate this scene. Yes, I know Wesley was a terrible character so a lot of people look on this as a cathartic moment but it really really shouldn't be. Wesley was terrible because he would wrap the narrative & have other characters act OOC to make himself look good. This scene has Picard act the most unlike himself that he ever does in the whole Damn show! This isn't a "good" Wesley moment it's emblematic of everything that's wrong with that character.

No, if you want a good Picard/Wesley scene go watch the episode where Picard lectures Wesley about his responsibility to the truth in the episode with Not-Tom Paris.
 
I fucking hate this scene. Yes, I know Wesley was a terrible character so a lot of people look on this as a cathartic moment but it really really shouldn't be. Wesley was terrible because he would wrap the narrative & have other characters act OOC to make himself look good. This scene has Picard act the most unlike himself that he ever does in the whole Damn show! This isn't a "good" Wesley moment it's emblematic of everything that's wrong with that character.

No, if you want a good Picard/Wesley scene go watch the episode where Picard lectures Wesley about his responsibility to the truth in the episode with Not-Tom Paris.
I didn't post that scene as an example of good star trek writing. I posted that scene in response to not wanting to hear Wil Wheaton read an audiobook, in which case "shut up, Wesley" is very accurate.
 
Mean Girls (2024) - First off, it's not as good as the original. But I think a lot of that comes from it trying to do too much. It doesn't give enough time to really build the characters and the comedy like in the original because they put in a number of songs from the Broadway musical, but it doesn't feel like a *true* musical because there's only a handful of songs. The songs are fine, but I didn't fine myself humming any of them afterwards. It hits all the important points, but it's just okay. I think Hairspray really set the bar high for these adaptations; it shows it can be done really well.

Truth be told, I watched it because they filmed in our town. The school they used it where Li'l Z plays basketball in the winter, so it was funny to see it on film.
 
Into the Outback

Honestly as far as straight to Streaming animated films go, not that bad, the characters are likable enough, the story is fine, I recommend it!
 
Watched a few movies recently.

Inside Out 2

I find I'm still thinking about it after seeing in theaters on Thursday. The first movie is not just my favourite Pixar movie, but one of my all-time favourites. This one...might not be quite as good, but I'd have to watch them both again to see for sure. But I really enjoyed it, either way. Where as the first movie dealt with depression, this one deals with anxiety. And while I was never diagnosed with anxiety, the negative self-talk and crystal balling thoughts hit close to home for me. The animation is just as good, if not better in the sequel. I'm glad I saw it in theaters, but I really don't understand why people are saying this one is so bad.

Death to Smoochy

One of those movies always wanted to see, but never got around to it. I've seen it lambasted by most people, but I don't know, I kinda dug it. It's tonally all over the place, and Robin Williams is surprisingly not in the movie as much as I expected. He still plays a major role, but most of the screentime is on Edward Norton. Which isn't necessarily a bad thing, just that I didn't expect it. Honestly, everything change so quickly throughout the movie, there's little time left to let things settle, even for a short time. You don't really get any good, quieter character moments because it just goes goes goes. Still, I enjoyed it for what it was. Probably not a movie I'll ever feel like revisiting.

Godzilla Minus One

I really regret not seeing this in theaters because goddamn, it was great. I've said before that I love that we have two completely different Godzilla franchises these days. You have Legendary's Monsterverse, which is like a big budget spectacle ala pro-wrestling. And then you have Toho's like this or Shin Godzilla, which has more meaning behind it.

I think I've been spoiled of Legendary's special effects, though, because I found this Godzilla a little stiff at times. It didn't seem as alive or animated as the Legendary counterpart. I don't know if it was a guy in a suit or done practically, but it felt stiffer to me. Also not really crazy about the fins on his back clicking into his back to fire his atomic breath. It seemed kind of unnecessary, almost like an action figure.

Still, Godzilla here was absolutely terrifying and I really enjoyed this one.

I Saw the TV Glow

After all the hype from people I trust on social media, I REALLY wanted to like this one and...didn't.

As interesting as it is as a transgender or LGBTQ metaphor, the pacing is atrocious. There were multiple long scenes where nothing happened and I found I was just bored by most of it. It takes far too long getting to the crux of the situation, and by the time you get there, there's barely any movie left to really explore it.

I think I'm just starting to understand about myself that my ADHD does not let me have the patience for movies with a slow burn, like this or Dune.
 
Inside Out 2
I find I'm still thinking about it after seeing in theaters on Thursday.
IMHO this is some of the highest praise a person can give any movie, that it sticks with them long after it's done. For me, the poster child for this was Mononoke Hime. It was still intruding as much as a month later.
I think I'm just starting to understand about myself that my ADHD does not let me have the patience for movies with a slow burn, like this or Dune.
As a fellow acronym-bearer, I will tell you this is absolutely not true...IF the movie is made with this in mind. Yes, there are way too many movies that have loads of boring, dry dialogue and loooong, empty scenes, but if the movie has worked to really make you feel invested in the characters and tuned it with appropriate score and pacing, even the most flighty viewer will stay glued to the screen.

--Patrick
 
Inside Out 2

I liked it. I watched it with my wife at the movie theater (at which I put ketchup on a churro), and I'm glad I did because the animation is a step up from the first film. Minor details like the emotions' skin textures, Riley's sweatdrops as she plays hockey, the avalanche of memories etc are all marvelously brought to life.

In terms of the story, characters, themes etc it was basically building on the foundations of the first film, so maybe this movie might feel a bit derivative or less original, but oh well, it's a sequel and that's to be expected. Following along as Riley goes through the whirlwind of feelings that come with puberty hits as close to home as the events of the first movie, and the cathartic understanding achieved at the end as Riley's emotions are brought together in harmony is still just as satisfying.

Also, as a minor humorous note, as we were leaving the theater, I overheard a mom ask her young daughter, "Which character was your favorite?" And the daughter replied, "The green one, she's the prettiest."
 
Went and saw Inside Out 2 last night. Enjoyable, yes it builds off the first one. You would have to restructure the whole movie to have it work as a standalone. Interesting concepts with the “memory vault” (that’s what I’m calling it) and the core of personality. 2 post credits scenes, one dealing with Riley and the family about 1/3 through, and the other is at the very end and I enjoyed it. None as good as the post credits dogs/cats or boys.
 
Boy Kills World
This movie is basically John Wick if it didn’t have a “TOO MUCH” button.
Loved every minute of it.
 
A Quiet Place: Day One
I liked the first movie, and I was meh about the sequel.

This prequel did not need to be made. There is nothing here to see, story wise. Yes, you get to see what it was like on the first day the aliens arrived. But they already showed you that in Part 2. After the initial scene (and if you’ve seen the trailer, you’ve seen most of it already) the movie becomes listless. Characters drift in and out of scenes with little concrete motivation; character development is limited and at times non-sensical. The plot’s structure hinges on creating tension through stupid or random contrivances that just leave you tilting your head at the screen in confusion.

The cat is cute, but that is not enough to make this movie worthwhile.

I would give it 1.5 out of 5.
 
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A Quiet Place: Day One

It was entertaining enough, I think. The cast generally do fairly well, and while the storyline is fairly simple and doesn't really contain any unexpected developments, there are still some interesting and tense moments. After the initial chaos of the first alien attacks, the movie settles into the familiar formula of its character having to do things completely silently, with most scenes dedicated to showing how (character) needs to overcome (situation) without making any sound. There are some interesting visuals, the most striking of which for me was the various shots of New York city streets completely silent, deserted, and devastated.

One thing that confused me though was the nearly complete absence of corpses. You've got aliens slaughtering the population of New York and there are virtually no dead bodies anywhere? Are the aliens eating them up, bones and clothes and all? Or did the movie just have to not show bloodied cadavers to preserve its PG-13 rating?

EDIT: Also, forgot to mention, I'm happy that post-apocalyptic fiction's favorite overused trope "humans are the real monsters" was entirely absent in this movie. Everyone behaved charitably and altruistically (to a realistic degree), and it's nice to see people come together and cooperate to overcome challenges.
 
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Are the aliens eating them up, bones and clothes and all? Or did the movie just have to not show bloodied cadavers to preserve its PG-13 rating?
You're forgetting the third option, where it's cheaper to not have them present and the studio doesn't think the audience will be paying close enough attention to those kinds of details to notice and/or care.
 
You're forgetting the third option, where it's cheaper to not have them present and the studio doesn't think the audience will be paying close enough attention to those kinds of details to notice and/or care.
I noticed! I cared!

I'm not important enough for studios to care about me! :foreveralone:
 
Fly Me to the Moon
I caught a special advanced screening tonight (yay for $5 Mystery Movie Nights at Regal Cinemas). The movie’s actual release will be on Friday, July 5th.

For those of you who may be unfamiliar, Fly Me to the Moon is about NASA’s effort to get the Apollo 11 mission off the ground, with a big focus on the political and social challenges that came from a disillusioned American public in the late 60’s. It is loosely, and I cannot emphasize this enough, LOOSELY based on real events. The overall events are real, but the characters and some major plot points are completely made up. It’s basically an alternate history.

It’s a fun, somewhat saccharine film that is buoyed by great acting - which makes up for mediocre dialogue. Scarlett Johansson plays a marketing wiz hired by a shady government agent (a delightfully spooky Woody Harrelson) to “sell” the Apollo 11 mission so the U.S. can beat the Russians. Channing Tatum is a self-serious Mission Control leader irritated that she is there pitching ad tie-ins, hiring camera-friendly actors to play engineers, etc. It’s pure fluff, but if you go in knowing that you can still enjoy it while soaking up the nostalgic Americana monologues sprinkled throughout.

I would give it 3 out of 5 stars. Good, but definitely not great.
 
Zebraman 2: Attack on Zebra City

YEAH...this was weird, not just Takashi Miike weird, but in a "This was a weird way to go for a sequel". Like, I ENJOYED a lot of it, there were some good action scenes, special effects, and a few good jokes, but I feel while the first one had lesser special effects, it also had a more cohesive story as WELL as more heart to it.
 
A Quiet Place: Day One

I went to see this Sunday afternoon. Meant to post about it sooner. Anyway.

This was okay. Of the three, this is definitely the weakest. I enjoyed it, but it doesn't gave the same strong connection to the characters like the family in the first two. One character joins about halfway through and we're supposed to just immediately accept him even when he's nowhere near as interesting as Lupita Nyong'o.

While it's an interesting story, it doesn't reveal much new about the original invasion. It doesn't reveal anything new about the monsters, either.

Still, it was well shot and it was never boring. Not sure if it was worth seeing in theaters, but it was okay.
 
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