Whats for Dinner?

Messed up baking a deep dish pizza. Used to much yeast in the dough. Tasted as if I made the dough with beer instead of water.
 
We had basic hamburgers, but I tried grilling the watermelon slices. Just sprinkle them with a little salt, and char marks on each side. It was really tasty!
 

Dave

Staff member
I made my own burgers from scratch. Had to slow cook them so they got cooked all the way through, but they were awesome.
 
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Probably a German word for it, but just a meal of left over bits.

Left over nuggets, left over cheese in the pogey poutine, all the veggies in the salad are left over scraps too.
 
"Reste" = "remainder" and "essen" = "eat" so I guess it works.
"Rüschel" more literally means "trimmings" but I got there by asking for a German translation of "leftover morsels."

--Patrick
 
Apparently there is some debate whether it's Resteessen or Essensreste. Dict.cc and Google say Essensreste, Leo.org says Resteessen. It might be different depending on where in the German speaking world you're from.
 
Germans put their words together in a certain way to describe things. The first part i s like a modifier for the second part.(A teacher can describe it better then me.)
Essens (Food) + Reste (Leftover) = Essensreste (Food Leftovers)
Reste (Leftover) + Essen (Food) = Resteessen (Meal of Leftovers)

More examples

Fahr (driving) + Zeug (Thing) = Drivingthing (Car)
Hub (Lifting) + Schrauber (Screwmaschine) = Helicopter
 
Germans put their words together in a certain way to describe things. The first part i s like a modifier for the second part.
English does something sort of similar. When you say “The big red car,” what you are really saying is something like, “Of those red cars, I am speaking of the big one.” The order of adjectives builds the hierarchy of sets and subsets.

—Patrick
 
“Adjectives in English absolutely have to be in this order: opinion-size-age-shape-colour-origin-material-purpose Noun. So you can have a lovely little old rectangular green French silver whittling knife. But if you mess with that word order in the slightest you’ll sound like a maniac. It’s an odd thing that every English speaker uses that list, but almost none of us could write it out.”
 
Germans put their words together in a certain way to describe things. The first part i s like a modifier for the second part.(A teacher can describe it better then me.)
Essens (Food) + Reste (Leftover) = Essensreste (Food Leftovers)
Reste (Leftover) + Essen (Food) = Resteessen (Meal of Leftovers)

More examples

Fahr (driving) + Zeug (Thing) = Drivingthing (Car)
Hub (Lifting) + Schrauber (Screwmaschine) = Helicopter
So does Dutch.
To be fair, even English, they usually just don't join them together. Wine bottle vs bottle (of) wine, for example.
 
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